INTERNATIONAL POETRY COMPETITION

We have the winners! It always takes longer than we anticipate. We need the time to read all the poems from the Finalists board. In order to be fair, the chosen poems are re-read many times. That way we know we are selecting from all the choices to the best of our ability.
For the next competition we will continue to 'approve' poems before they are posted on the board. It has cut back on the amount of spam that gets posted on the board.

Gerry has written his comments and they are below. He tells it like it is, his comments are accurate and descriptive. Also, we have our "Honorable Mentions" listed below, they were close and merit mention.
Lastly - we thank you for your patience. We hope you join us for our 16th competition, which will be announced shortly in the next months.
Many thanks to our poetry readers and judges, who spend many hours reading poems from the board, we acknowledge and appreciate their hard work during competition selection of poems. It's not an easy task.



    Aman Basra

    "Poems for Lucy XV11"

    Cristina Rizzuto

    "Bay & Bloor "

    Karina

    "Ruts"





Poems for Lucy XVII

In two words: Absolutely relevant. Our 15th International Mattia Poetry Competition winner accomplishes this win with a simple, humble and observant piece. Although product specific, the ever growing technological advancement that is the ‘personal device’ is aptly portrayed in “poems for Lucy XVII”. There is no in depth commentary on how we arrived at this form of communication; Basra chooses a somewhat innocent, first person portrayal of the experience as it stands for us all in some way or another. The various inferences to the arts do not go unnoticed: “paints Apples…/Marimba notes…’, a nice touch. The dependency on technology is wonderfully achieved in the final lines, “ I hear your voice - /my home phone number”. Congratulations on a wonderful poem!

Bay & Bloor

The decision to choose how we view the world and how we pen it – that is a writer’s stand. Rizzuto might be any one of us walking up and down the street. However, one can’t help but feel that the poet captured a moment rather effectively – standing still. There is a good hit here on introspection in this bit and it draws the reader in to, “Bay and Bloor “, beginning with well penned lines: “There’s a homeless man who plays milkshake-flavoured/tunes on the corner of Bay and Bloor.” The thought of what ‘milkshake- flavoured tunes’ sound like before any more information is provided about where the reader might be makes the intersection come to life (Even if you are not familiar with this famous Canadian intersection). We have all seen elements of what this piece portrays in every city. That is not the point. Rizzuto brings us to that corner. . .the cross popular sidewalk. . . anywhere street. Most attempts at placing Canadian streets in poetry fall short in using street names . . . she made this reader stand there at Bay & Bloor and think about the last coin I tossed while I was there (and some other coins tossed into cases in other cities as well). Congratulations!

Ruts

This 3rd place finisher is notable for its visual effectiveness. The movement throughout is mathematical, geometrical and musical as it intended to be. Karina not only achieves a balance of the above tour of science and art but does so without the use of punctuation. How refreshing to read a poet who relies on the honesty of word and line break. “Ruts” is a perfect title for such a worthy absorption of movement. Thank you Karina.

In no particular Order

The Tea Grows Cold - Anna Yin
Autumnal Solitude - Sonja
Untitled - S.R. Helen McDermott
Ice-cold Slop - Christy Bailes
Pipe Dream - Elyane Alletson
Lady in the Mirror - Kori Flynn
Cinderella - Allison Steinman
Marshmallows - Amanda Robertson
Teacher Perfect - Usha Palat
Unworn Necklace - Ernesto P. Santiago




Aman Basra

Poems for Lucy XV11


Landlines are dead,
the latest hipster decree
paints Apples as art.
Age of the portable,
touchscreen fruits,
where wires and cords are passé.
Marimba notes enter
the lobes of my ear,
my rectangular apple shines
a familiar set of numbers
and a fleeting
image of a smiling face.
My thumb slides and unlocks,
I place the apple against my ear.
Before my lips can form words,
before my vocal cords can awaken,
I hear your voice –
my home phone number.


Cristina Rizzuto

Bay & Bloor


Is there anything as sad as reality?
There’s a homeless man who plays milkshake-flavoured
tunes on the corner of Bay and Bloor.
I see him in the subway tunnels sometimes, crouched over
an ancient guitar case,
the leather gallantly peeling after years
of artistic creation,
induced happiness.
He is on the street, playing to an audience of
careless, faceless people,
stray beetles, the one woman who
listens quietly and gives change,
a lone warrior for humanity.
Play a song for me.


Karina

Ruts


The story of wrinkles
as they form
tied with a string
stems of flowers
a pool of nodes
or diverse roads squealing like
an accordion in tandem
to moveable figures
placed symmetrically
side by side
Almost flushed by the attention
and when dissonance
breaks us apart
we strive and stride and smile
for freedom undressed us
of ourselves and we realised
the disgrace
We unplugged a thought
and slid it in the space
now available
no more a disgrace
and yet all we needed was
to confuse ourselves
mesh up the grey matter
stir up a case



All prizes are paid by The Mattia Family. We have a love of poetry. Please allow 4-6 weeks for prize awards. Lastly, we thank you for all
your efforts. Join us for our next competition which will be announced on the "News" page, located from the MAIN INDEX at www.mattia.ca
That is the place to visit for future competitions. On behalf of The Mattia Family - thank you.
DEE MATTIA
         GERRY MATTIA

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